How To Clean Non-Stick Pans

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What a great invention and time saver non-stick pans are. The challenge for today’s cook can be how to clean non-stick pans without ruining those specialized surfaces. If you have challenges with food getting stuck to the pan or just trying to get up small amounts of burned food bits and so on from your non-stick pans, these tips can help ensure that your pans are spic and span clean.

Did you know that the material we use to make non-stick pans was actually invented in 1938? An engineer working for Dupont on a top secret military project created the material. It wasn’t used on pots and pans until a housewife noticed her husband coating his fishing gear with the stuff to keep it from getting tangled up. She thought it might be just the thing her pots needed and suggested to her husband that he try coating her pans with the stuff, and voila! Teflon was born. The rest, as they say, is history. Today’s products for non-stick pans include Teflon but many other materials have since also been developed for this purpose.

Ours wasn’t the earliest effort to keep things from sticking to pans though. As long ago as the ancient Greeks, pans were being shaped to allow for the easy removal of food. So cooking and baking challenges have been around for a long time. Today, though, with modern chemistry, we have been able to develop fantastic products such as our non-stick pans.

The trick is, how to keep those surfaces scratch-free and looking as good as new. With only a few common household materials that you likely already have, like vinegar, you can get your pots and pans shiny and new.

Find out how to clean non-stick pans and other things at the website, How To Clean Stuff, by following the link below.

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